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WHAT IS LATINO/A STUDIES?
SPRING 2015 COURSES

Intro to Latino/a Studies
Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Latino/a Studies, and how it reconfigures the study of the United States and the Americas. Considered literature, history, sociology, economics, politics, culture and language in examining terms such as: Latino, latinidad, Global South, transnational, globalization, and multiculturalism. Exploration of alignments and divergences of Latino/a Studies with African and African American Studies, Latin American ad Caribbean Studies, and Critical US Studies. Classroom learning will connect with the community outside of Duke. Required introductory course for students in the Latino/a Studies in the Global South certificate program.

Spanish for Heritage Speakers
Designed for students who are heritage speakers, educated almost exclusively in English, with little exposure to Spanish in academic setting. Linguistic work contextualized through three major fields: arts (music, literature, cinema, painting, sculpting); society (Latinos & language in the US, traditions, immigration related topics); and mass media (television, radio, newspapers, new technologies). 

Health, Culture, Latino Community
Exploration of health issues in the Spanish-speaking world shaped by social, cultural, political, ethnic, and economic determinants. Topics to be explored include: cultural competency, community beliefs, medical practices and policies, preventive medicine, mental health.

Latino/a Voices in Duke, Durham, and Beyond
Community-based interaction with Durham Public Schools. Topics for consideration: Latino/a identity, access to education for immigrants, academic performance, assimilation, general pressures of family and peers, bilingualism, configurations of ethno-racial consciousness.

US Latino Literature/Culture Studies; Latino/a Autobiography and Memoir
This seminar considers cultural and intellectual approaches to the construction and emergence of individual self-awareness and self-reference, exploring a variety of representations of the autobiographical voice, textual authority, and the boundaries between fact and fiction. Of particular concern is how these cultural producers live and literarily represent both the America and the Latin/o America of their time. Through autobiography, memoir, literary criticism, theoretical readings, as well as visual and poetic approaches to subjectivity, we will interrogate how self, place, and “community” are negotiated. 

Politics of Food
Explores the food system through fieldwork, study, and guest lectures that include farmers, nutritionists, sustainable agriculture advocates, rural organizers, and farmworker activists. Examines how food is produced, seeks to identify and understand its workers and working conditions in fields and factories, and, using documentary research conducted in the field and other means, unpacks the major current issues in the food justice arena globally and locally.

Myth, Ritual, Symbol
What might something as everyday as a football game, a dream, watching a movie or telling/hearing a bedtime story reveal about deeply human processes like identity and power? What about weddings, or war? This course examines the apparent contradiction that a myth is both untrue (separate from a fact or science) and "the mythic" refers to deep human history, to ways of thinking, believing, and feeling that have life and death effects (like the Myth of the American Dream, or of Oedipus). Or that we dismiss ritual as something empty, rote, and meaningless, (separate from spontaneous, real events) and yet our lives are filled with both small, quotidian rites (the morning shower and coffee, going to church, synagogue mosque, temple...) and built around profoundly moving ways we recognize life transitions (baptism, turning 21, graduation, funerals).

LSGS Courses

FROM THE DIGITAL ARCHIVES
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LSGS EVENTS, IN PICTURES
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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

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    • Jennine Capó Crucet, reading from her debut collection of short stories, How to Leave Hialeah (University of Iowa Press, 2009), 6 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Brando Skyhorse
    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

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    • Brando Skyhorse, reading from Take This Man (Simon & Schuster, 2014), 3 November 2014.

    • Daisy Hernández Reading
    • Daisy Hernández, reading from A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press, 2014), 29 October 2014.

    • Daisy Hernández
    • Daisy Hernández, reading from A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press, 2014), 29 October 2014.

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    • Daisy Hernández, reading from A Cup of Water Under My Bed (Beacon Press, 2014), 29 October 2014.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Lázaro Lima, "Losing Sonia Sotomayor: On the Political Limits of Representative Latinidad," 23 October 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger.

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    • Raúl Coronado, "Surrounding One's Self with the Beauty of Life: Historicizing Nineteenth-Century Latina/o Writing," 18 September 2014 | Photographs by Hanes Motsinger

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    • U.S. Census Boxes
    • A presentation from "Arrivals and Departures: An LSGS Undergraduate Research Symposium," which featured semester-long projects by students enrolled in Fall 2014 Latino/a Studies seminars.

    • Time To Break Stereotypes!
    • A presentation from "Arrivals and Departures: An LSGS Undergraduate Research Symposium," which featured semester-long projects by students enrolled in Fall 2014 Latino/a Studies seminars.

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    • LSGS Social Profile
IN THE BROWN STUDY

The Latino/a experience affects the entire United States, if not the world.

Lend your ears to "Taking on Academia: A Conversation about Latino Studies," a podcast from NPR's Latino USA centering on the field's importance, its current state, and what educators want going forward. The episode features Frances R. Aparicio, Professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University; Nancy "Rusty" Barceló, President of Northern New Mexico College; and Juana María Rodríguez, Professor in the Gender and Women’s Studies Department at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Tu vives allí by Izel Vargas. Used by kind permission of the artist.
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ARROB@ BLOG
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VICTORIA BOULOUBASIS, a food writer and journalist who covers food's cultural symbolism and identity, sustainable agriculture, the fight for fair food access and farmworker and labor rights, started off the 2015 Arrob@ blog with a look at seasonal and migratory rural labor in the rural South. Her first post offered a snapshot of Guadalupe, in rural eastern North Carolina, who "works the overnight shift at a poultry processing plant. She cuts chicken breasts off of the bone, by hand. Hundreds of them, from 7 pm to 7 am." Bouloubasis writes, "Here in North Carolina, a powerful, thriving, dominant agricultural industry is tightly interwoven with and hugely dependent on migrant labor. I think we sometimes forget that this works because we eat, because we consume, and because too many of us are comfortable (or comforted) in our ignorance."
Watch for our next blogger, Historian JOHN MCKIERNAN-GONZALEZ, who will share with us this spring.

VIDEO

Faces of Time/Rostros del Tiempo, a film by Charlie Thompson, professor of cultural anthropology and documentary studies at Duke University. Per WUNC: "From 1942-1964 about five million Mexican guest workers were brought to the United States as part of a federal program to help with the post-war labor shortage. These workers were known as Braceros, 'strong arms,' and they harvested crops throughout the country. When they were done, the U.S. government took mandatory deductions from their wages, promising a retirement fund for them when they returned to Mexico. Decades later, many of them have still not received all of their retirement money. Faces of Time/Rostros del Tiempo documents their story and their continuing protests for justice."

CURIOSITIES » AROUND THE WEB
    • Joaquín Torres-García | New York Docks, 1920

» "From Tobacco to Tortillas: Latinos Remake Durham, North Carolina," an NBC News article about Bull City's Latino and Latina population: "After a two-decade period of adjustment, this city of Southern heritage appears also to be cultivating a Hispanic heritage. 'People are getting used to the fact that Latinos are here.'"

» Highlights from the 17 September 2010–9 January 2011 exhibit Nueva York (1613–1945), a joint venture by the New-York Historical Society and El Museo del Barrio, can be found online. Nueva York explores how Manhattan's long and deep involvement with Spain and Latin America has affected virtually every aspect of the city's development, from commerce, manufacturing and transportation to communications, entertainment and the arts. Bringing together New York's oldest museum (New-York Historical Society) and its leading Latino cultural institution (El Museo del Barrio), Nueva York spans more than three centuries of history: from the founding of New Amsterdam in the 1600s to the present day. To borrow from a NPR article, Nueva York casts light on South-North story, as "the first Hispanic immigrant arrived in New York City in the 1600s and today, almost 400 years later, Hispanics have become the largest minority in the U.S." The above painting, New York Docks (1920), is by Joaquín Torres-García (Uruguay, 1874–1949). Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of Collection Société Anonyme.

» "A Piece of the Wall," a 4,000-word article about Arizona and the U.S.-Mexico border, written entirely on Twitter by Nigerian-American novelist Teju Cole, over the span of seven hours and posted on 13 March 2014.

» "A Room of Her Own: My Mother's Altar," an installation by renowned writer Sandra Cisneros at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, from 31 October 2014–12 January 2015. Watch and participate in live mobile broadcasts on the Latino Virtual Museum channel, LVM Stream, starting on 27 October.


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