THE LATINX NINETEENTH CENTURY

390S.01

Read latinidad across critical differences in this literary seminar on major historical events shaping the nineteenth century US political landscape. From the Indian Removal Act, the Revolution of Texas and the Mexican American War, to the US Civil War, the Chinese Exclusion Act and the Spanish American War, “America” was built on transnational acts of racialized violence. In this class, students will engage with factual and fictional accounts from or about the nineteenth century, including historical novels by María Ruiz de Burton, Carmen Boullosa, Cristina García, and Emma Pérez. Speaking from various positionalities and intellectual traditions, these and other authors illuminate the racial borders of Latinx Studies and illustrate the ongoing need for the historically-generative vocabularies of settler colonialism, critical Latinx Indigeneities, Afro-Latinidades, whiteness, Asian Latinidades, Pan-Americanism, queer Latinidades, and decoloniality. As students are introduced to archival-based work through the vantage point of “the Latinx nineteenth century,” they will learn how some of the identity categories of today were once crafted and forged outside of the given, 1960s moment of Latinx political emergence. They will also explore how latinidad has been made and remade across the racial geographies of the US, Latin America, and the Caribbean, and reflect on the radical, political potential of living somewhere in-between them.

 

LATINX 19C KAHLO

Crosslisting Numbers: 

HISTORY 390S
LIT 390S
ROMST 390S

Curriculum Codes: 

ALP, CCI, CZ